Buckmark Cleaning

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Tools and Supplies

These are the cleaning tools and supplies that I use when cleaning my Buckmarks.  A Patchworm kit, cleaning patches, a small bottle of solvent, a small bottle of gun oil, a silicone cloth, a few toothpicks, a box of q-tips, and a roll of paper towels is all you really need.  Other stuff, like bronze brushes, dental picks, bore snakes, cleaning mats, etc., can make cleaning quicker or easier, but you can do a good job without them.

Item Notes Links
Wood stick cotton swabs
    (a.k.a. Q-Tips)
  • Pro Tip: Use pliers to crush the end of the q-tip when you need to fit a smaller space (under the extractor, in the extractor groove in the barrel, etc.)
  • Pro Tip: Pull 80% of the cotton off to clean inside 1/8" holes
  • Ones made for gun cleaning are stronger and shed less lint, but are much more expensive.
  • Normal 3" swabs work great for most things, but sometimes you need longer swabs (6" or 8").
  • Ones made for gun cleaning can be found with larger cotton heads, sized for 9mm, 45, etc. The 9mm ones are great for cleaning inside the grip/magazine well on a Buckmark.
Amazon - cotton swabs wood sticks
Brands...
  • RamRodz: Very Good (22 cal) (9mm)
  • Royal: Good
  • Sound Body: Ok
  • Amoray: Ok
  • H&B: Weak
Toothpicks
  • For removing gunk from inside edges, for applying grease, and for use as slave pins
  • Round ones tend to be stronger and pointier and better for corners, but flat ones (sandwich picks) are good for spreading, scraping, and sandpaper backing. I use both kinds.
Amazon - toothpicks wood
Dental Picks
  • Plastic (delrin) picks are great for scraping (can reach where toothpicks are too short).
  • Brass picks are good for really hard fouling, and are not likely to scratch the gun.
  • Metal picks are good for really hard fouling, and cheap, but you need to be careful not to scratch the gun. Steel picks are stronger, which is great when using them to pull on stuff, or to pry things apart.
Midway USA - Tiption Plastic Picks
Midway USA - Hoppes Brass Picks
Brownells - Lyman Pick and Brush Set
Amazon - Gun Cleaning Picks
Paper Towels
  • Blue shop towels are better than kitchen style (absorbent, lay flat, less lint).
  • A couple layers makes a reusable, but ultimately disposable cleaning pad.
  • Cut into quarters makes a good size for general gun cleaning tasks.
Amazon - scott shop towels
Bore Cleaning Solvent
  • Hoppes #9 is the standard, and is fairly mild.
    Rimfire Blend, M-Pro 7, and others are good, too.
  • Do not need a copper solvent, unless shooting copper covered bullets.
  • Small 4oz bottle is plenty.
Brownells - Hoppes #9
Midway USA - Hoppes #9
Natchez - Hoppes #9
Gun Oil / Grease
  • Thin Oil: Remington RemOil
  • Medium Oil: Mil-Comm MC2500
  • Thick Oil: Shooter's Choice FP-10
  • Grease: Mil-Comm TW25B
  • Dry Lube (for magazines): Hornady Dry Lube
  • Action Lube (for hammer/sear): Brownells Action Lube
  • Only need a few ounces.
Natchez - Rem Oil
Brownells - Mil-Comm Oil
Midway USA - FP-10 Brownells - Hornady Dry Lube
Brownells Action Lube
CLP
(cleaner, lubricant, protector)
  • Good for cleaning metal parts.
  • Breakfree CLP is the standard, but many others are available.
  • Liquid is better than foam or spray; easier to control application.
  • Small 4oz bottle is plenty.
Brownells - Breakfree CLP
Natchez - Breakfree CLP
Midway USA - all CLP options
Bore Cleaning Tools
  • Patchworm pull-through system works well, and only costs $11, but lacks bronze brush option.
  • Traditional cleaning rods work well, but cannot be used on Buckmarks without some disassembly of the gun.
  • Some pull-through systems have brush options, but they need to be VERY short to fit between the barrel and slide.
Patchworm Field Kit
Natchez - Pro-Shot Cleaning Kit
Midway USA - Pro-Shot 22 cleaning kit
Midway USA - Carbon Fiber Cleaning Rod
Midway USA - Tipton Carbon Fiber Cleaning Rod
Midway USA - Pro-Shot Pull-through Cleaning Kit
Patches
  • For 22 caliber, 7/8" or 3/4" size patches are good. Thin patch material can use 1" size.
  • Cotton flannel is traditional and works well.
  • I like Patchworm 7/8" patches; they are cheap $9 for 500, and work fine.
  • I dislike the synthetic (non-cotton) Hoppes patches; too thin and not very absorbent.
Patchworm - 7/8" cotton patches, round
Midway USA - Pro-Shot cotton flannel patches, square
Midway USA - Butch's Triple Twill patches
Cleaning Rod Ends
When using a cleaning rod after disassembly.
  • A patch holder loop holds a patch loosely. Good for applying solvent or oil.
  • A jag pierces the patch and holds it tightly. Good for removing solvent, oil, and grime.
  • A bronze brush dipped in solvent scrapes the inside of the bore. Good for heavy cleaning.
  • A nylon brush scrapes the inside of the bore. Good for moderate cleaning.
  • A mop is good for applying solvent or oil, but gets dirty quickly.
Midway USA - Pro-Shot 22 Jag
Midway USA - Tipton 22 Jag
Midway USA - Bore Tech Loop
Midway USA - Otis Bronze Brush
Midway USA - Pro-Shot Bronze Brush
Midway USA - Pro-Shot Bore Mop
Midway USA - Dewey Bore Mop
Chamber Brush
  • Used to clean the chamber area, which can develop a carbon ring, causing reliability issues.
  • A .25 caliber rifle-length bronze brush bent into an L-shape so that the brush part of the tip is the length of a 22 round, works well for this.
Midway USA - Dewey 25 caliber rilfe brush
Midway USA - Pro-Shot 25 caliber rilfe brush
Silicone Cloth
  • Used at the end of the cleaning process to wipe down the entire outside of the gun. Safe on metal, wood, and plastic.
  • Great for removing fingerprints from metal.
  • Helps prevent rust.
  • Leaves gun looks great.
Natchez - Pro-Shot Silicone Cloth
Brownells - Kleen Bore Silicone Cloth
Brownells - Birchwood Casey Silicone Cloth

Things that are nice to have


Things I don't use



After every time you shoot

  1. Make sure the gun is unloaded. Remove the magazine, check the chamber. Safety first.
  2. Lock the slide back.
  3. Use a cotton swab to scrub carbon build-up off the back of the barrel and front face of the slide, and wipe off the feed ramp.
  4. Optional - pull a bore snake through the barrel bore.
  5. Clean out any wax accummulated in the front inside of the magazine with a cotton swab (long ones help here).


Cleaning without disassembly (every 500 - 1000 rounds)

This process takes about 20-30 minutes once you've done it a few times.

  1. Make sure the gun is unloaded. Remove the magazine, check the chamber. Safety first.
  2. Lock the slide back.
  3. Pull a loose patch soaked in bore solvent through the bore. If really dirty, do another. Let it sit for 3-5 minutes. While you're waiting...
  4. Use a cotton swab soaked in bore solvent to scrub carbon build-up off the back of the barrel and front face of the slide, and wipe off the feed ramp. First soaked swab is mostly to apply solvent. Second swab can be used to scrub off the fouling. Lead build up can be scraped off with a toothpick or plastic dental pick. Use a toothpick to get the fouling that builds up inside the case rim recess in the front of the slide.
  5. A cotton swab crushed by pliers can clean the extractor groove in the back of the barrel, and under the extractor on the front of the slide.
  6. Pull 2 or 3 tight dry patches through the bore.
  7. Pull second loose patch soaked in bore solvent through the bore. Let it sit for 3-5 minutes. While you're waiting...
  8. Use a toothpick to clean out most of the hard-packed grime in the crown recess in the muzzle. Then use a cotton swab soaked in solvent to get the rest of it.
  9. Clean under the top rail. Turn the gun upside down. A crushed cotton swab fits between the top rail and the guide rod. Lots of grime accummulates between the barrel and the top rail. It's easiest to get with a plastic dental pick with a curved end. Note whether the top rail has a wear streak in the middle; if so, you'll want to lube that later.
  10. Gently clean grime off the guide rod with a cotton swab.
  11. Pull 2 or 3 tight dry patches through the bore.
  12. Pull an oiled patch through the bore. No need to wait after this one.
  13. Wipe the oiled patch on the crown. Wipe off any excess oil.
  14. Pull a dry patch through the bore to remove excess oil. The bore is done.
  15. Clean the inside of the slide, where you can reach with a cotton swab.
  16. Clean the inside of the frame around the chamber area; what you can reach with a regular 3" cotton swab.
  17. Clean the magazine well with long cotton swabs or a paper towel wrapped around a wooden dowel, toothbrush, plastic dental pick or similar. The 6" or 8" cotton swabs sized for 9mm bore cleaning work great for this, if you have them.
  18. DONE CLEANING THE GUN. TIME TO LUBRICATE IT.
  19. Lightly lubricate where the slide touches the frame or top rail. This can be done by putting a couple drops of your favorite gun oil on a cotton swab and wiping it across the surfaces of the slide and frame rails. Think of all the surfaces: top, bottom, inside, etc. Don't forget the bottom of the top rail (above the recoil guide rod).
  20. Lightly lubricate the exposed part of the guide rod.
  21. If you close the slide by pushing the slide stop lever down, lubricate the top inside surface of the slide stop lever.
  22. Wipe down the entire gun (except optics lenses) with a silicone cloth. It is safe on metal, wood, and plastic. It's great for removing fingerprints from metal, and helps prevent rust during storage. It also leaves the gun looking great.
  23. Clean the magazines.
    1. Clean outside with CLP.
    2. Wipe very dry. Do not leave the magazines wet (or even damp).
    3. Pull the follower down and hold it there.
    4. Clean inside with long cotton swabs or a paper towel wrapped around a wooden dowel, toothbrush, plastic dental pick or similar.
    5. The top of the magazine, around the feed lips, will be dirtiest part.
    6. Be sure to clean any wax accummulated in the front inside of the magazine.
    7. Spray with dry lube if you have it.


Complete Cleaning (every 3000-5000 rounds)